Best Coffee Makers For Camping – My Memorable Top 5

There’s no reason to skip your morning cup of coffee when camping. In fact, the smell of coffee brewing out in the wild is one of the best parts of a morning in nature.

But what’s the best way to make coffee at your campsite? There are so many options for making coffee when camping.

Let’s look at some of the best coffee makers for camping available right now.

I’ll break down some of the pros and cons of five of the top options and finish off with my recommendation.

Disclosure: Some of these links are affiliate links, and at no additional cost, I earn a commission if you buy which helps to maintain this website.

What Are The Best Coffee Makers For Camping?

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AeroPress

The AeroPress is a favorite among campers for many reasons. It’s very small, compact, and lightweight, weighing less than a pound.

This makes it a perfect option for backpacking, as well. It’s easy to use and makes delicious coffee.

So you don’t have to be an expert on how to make coffee when camping to get your morning (or afternoon or evening!) caffeine fix.

The grounds don’t sit in the water for long (as they do with a French press), so the coffee generally tastes less bitter.

Users also rave about the flavor of AeroPress coffee.

The AeroPress makes coffee by the cup, so you don’t have to worry about making too much.

And everyone can make their own custom brew to their taste and strength preferences.

It’s versatile, too, since you can also use it to make espresso-style coffee besides regular coffee.

While made out of plastic, it’s BPA free, and very durable. It stands up to dents and does not break easily, perfect for a long hike or a lot of use.

It’s easy to clean: the used grounds are compacted into a disk that you can usually discard at your site. And just need to rinse the AeroPress.

The AeroPress comes with paper filters. But there are also reusable metal filters available that are better for camping. This is because you don’t have to worry about producing waste.

You’ll need something to boil water in to use the AeroPress. But in some ways this makes it even more versatile.

This is because you can use any cooking vessel that you’re already bringing with you. And don’t have to worry about carrying heavy or bulky equipment.

Pros:

  • Lightweight, durable and compact
  • Easy to clean
  • Can use a reusable metal filter

Cons:

  • Not most suitable for large groups
  • Need to boil water separately

Hario V60

The Hario V60 is a consistent favorite camping coffee maker for many reasons.

First is the taste of the coffee it makes—many campers love the smooth flavor.

And the manufacturer describes it as “umami,”. This is that elusive element of flavor best described in English as savory.

It’s also easy to customize your cup of coffee. You can pour the water over the grounds quickly for a lighter taste, or more slowly for a deeper, stronger brew.

That way, everyone in your party can have a customized cup of coffee.

It’s also one of the most inexpensive options on this list. And it’s very lightweight, weighing less than a pound.

It’s small, although its shape is a bit awkward for carrying. Like the AeroPress, the Hario V60 requires a filter. And some users note that they have to be specially ordered.

That said, you can buy a reusable cloth filter, though that won’t be the easiest item to clean while camping.

Like the AeroPress, you need a separate contraption in which to heat the water. It’ll also need to be something that is easy to pour from.

This is because the rate at which you add water to the Hario V60 has a great deal to do with the flavor of the coffee. This makes it a bit less easy to use compared to the AeroPress.

Pros:

  • More control over the brewing process
  • One of the cheapest options
  • Small and lightweight

Cons:

  • Need to carry filters
  • Need to boil water separately
  • Need some knowledge of correct technique

Bialetti Moka Pot

Newer isn’t always better, and the Bialetti Moka Pot is testament to that fact, on and off the trail.

The Bialetti Moka Pot is a great option for campers. And it’s an especially versatile item, since you can use it every day, at home and at the campsite.

It’s available in a variety of sizes, from one cup all the way up to 12 cups, perfect if you have to supply a crowd. But the smaller model is usually better for camping since it’s easy to carry.

This is especially important if you’re camping somewhere that isn’t accessible by vehicle.

As a camping coffee maker, the ease of use is especially important. It doesn’t need any measuring, and it’s fast.

If taste is important to you, the Bialetti might be your best option. It’s great for preserving the flavor notes of the beans you use.

Its simple cleaning process also makes it good for camping.

All byproducts are completely biodegradable and earth-friendly. This is something the Bialetti company prides itself on.

What’s more, it only requires water to clean. In fact, you’re not supposed to clean your Bialetti with soap.

The more you use it, the better it tastes, and that makes it a simple camp coffee maker.

You’ll need some kind of heat source for the Bialetti. But it’ll work on whatever stove or cooktop you use for anything else while camping.

While it makes espresso, you can use fewer grounds for regular coffee.

Pros:

  • Good option for small or large groups
  • Lightweight and durable
  • Easy to clean

Cons:

  • Larger models aren’t compact
  • Takes longer compared to other options

GSI Percolator

Want a classic camping coffee percolator? The GSI is a great option.

One of the best things about this product is actually the way it looks.

It’s blue with white speckles. And you might recognize it from countless movies and classic shots of campers.

It isn’t only the look that makes this a great option for campers. The GSI is hardy.

It’s made of steel and the enamel finish is kiln-fired, making it resistant to chips and scratches.

At the same time, it’s lightweight, weighing only about a pound. Although it’s much less compact than other models on this list.

How’s the coffee? Pretty darn good, actually. One of the best things about the GSI is the even heating, for a consistent, delicious cup of coffee.

Because of the even heating, you can use the GSI on many heating sources, from camp stoves to a grate on an open flame.

It’s also fast, so you can get your day started quickly.

Pros:

  • Iconic style and appearance
  • Chip and scratch resistant
  • Lightweight

Cons:

  • Bulky and not very compact
  • Takes longer compared to other options

Wacaco Nanopresso

The Wacaco Nanopresso is a unique little gadget used to make espresso on the go.

Don’t let its size deceive you. This camp coffee maker produces divine espresso, complete with perfect crema. Every single time.

If taste matters more to you than anything else, the Wacaco Nanopresso might be your best bet.

It’s so delicious that you may even replace your home espresso maker.

One of the best features of this product is its size and shape. It’s tiny, only about six inches long; it fits into the palm of your hand.

Unlike some of the other options on this list, its compact shape makes it easy to stick in your backpack. It weighs less than a pound, too.

One of the neat things about this model is that it’s hand-operated, so you don’t need batteries or a power source.

It does need a little muscle, although newer models are easier to use than in the past.

One of the downsides of the Wacaco Nanopresso, though, is that it has a lot of little parts that you have to clean.

Needless to say, this is less than ideal at camping grounds, and they can be easily lost.

It’s also one of the most expensive options on this list. So you’ll want to do your research and make sure it meets your needs before purchasing.

Pros:

  • Claims to create enough pressure to make genuine espresso
  • Very compact and lightweight
  • No electricity needed

Cons:

  • Need to clean many little parts
  • Expensive compared to other options
  • Needs strength for creating pressure

What About A Coffee Grinder For Camping?

The easiest solution here is to travel with coffee that’s already ground, either in the store or at home.

But for those of us that need fresh-ground coffee, there are portable options.

There’s several on the market. But for the best hand coffee grinder for camping, look for something lightweight and durable.

You don’t want anything with a lot of little parts or that’s too bulky or large. You also may want to consider whether you have control over the grind itself.

Take a look at my post on the best hand coffee grinder for camping here.

Conclusion

So, which is the best coffee maker for camping?

In large part, that depends on your needs. Consider how often you camp, how many people you’re brewing for, and other personal factors.

All in all, though, the AeroPress is one of the most popular and is the favorite on this list.

A man in the wilderness pressing an AeroPress, one of the best coffee makers for camping.
It checks so many boxes, since it’s lightweight, compact, durable, and travels well.

You can use it to make coffee for a crowd or only for one. Most importantly, it makes a mean cup of coffee.

Whichever camp coffee maker or camping coffee percolator you choose, don’t forget the most important thing.

Enjoy your time in the great outdoors!

As always, use extreme care and caution whenever you use fire or a heat source.

Have you tried any of these camp coffee makers when you’ve gone camping? Do you have a different suggestion for the best coffee maker for camping?

Let me know in the comments below. Stay caffeinated!

How To Make Coffee When Camping – Simple And Painless

There’s nothing like a warm cup of coffee in the morning. It doesn’t matter where you are; if you’re a coffee drinker, you have to have it.

That includes when you’re on a camping trip, of course.

Coffee may even be more essential in this setting, as sleeping on the ground isn’t too comfortable.

Person lying down on the ground with mountains in the background.

So in this post, I’m going to look at how to make coffee when camping. I’ll cover:

  • how to boil water while camping,
  • how to make coffee on a camp stove,
  • how to make coffee without a campfire,
  • cowboy coffee, and
  • some products to help you make coffee while camping.

Even when roughing it in the wilderness, you don’t have to sacrifice flavor or even ease when it comes to your coffee.

There are many methods and tools to use to make a delicious cup of coffee, no matter where you’re waking up.

The most rugged, back-to-nature method of making camping coffee is cowboy coffee.

And I describe how to go about that process in this post (keep reading).

But I’ve have also included some more practical methods for the modern camper.

And recommend some tried-and-true camping tools for the perfect cup.

Who knows, you may even end up adopting your camping coffee practices at home.

Disclosure: Some of these links are affiliate links, and at no additional cost, I earn a commission if you buy which helps to maintain this website.

How To Boil Water While Camping

One essential element to coffee is hot water: there’s no way around it. Luckily, there are lots of ways to boil water while camping.

The most obvious method is the old-fashioned way. Light a good, classic campfire and boil your water over that.

A campfire burning surrounded by stones.

It’s how humans have done it for millennia. So it’s great for connecting to your distant ancestors, if that’s something you’re seeking.

Also, it reduces the amount of stuff that you need to carry to your campsite.

Almost everything you need for a good campfire can be found along the trail.

What Do You Need?

The one item you need to make sure that you bring is some kind of receptacle for your water, some kind of pot or pan.

If you have to walk to your campsite, you can use the same pot or pan that you use to cook your food. This will cut your packing list.

Before you light your fire, make sure that you have something that your pot can rest upon. You can find a few larger rocks to create a stable base.

Make sure that you have also collected plenty of fuel and kindling to keep the fire going.

Also, review important fire safety advisories before lighting a fire at your campsite. Have a method to put the fire out quickly, should the need arise.

You can even gather your water from a lake or river. You’ll need to filter it through something to remove the large sediments.

And make sure that you bring it to a rolling boil for at least three minutes. Talk about getting back to nature!

There are other methods to boil water while out in nature that don’t involve a fire, as well.

I discuss those below in the section, “How To Make Coffee Without A Campfire,” so keep reading!

How To Make Coffee When Camping – On A Camp Stove

A camp stove is a great alternative to a fire. It might even be essential.

Black and white image of a gooseneck kettle on a portable gas camping stove, which is one way how to make coffee when camping.

Sometimes, when it is very dry or windy in your region, park officials will ban campfires.

This is because of the risk that the fire will catch and become a forest fire.

Or, sometimes campers don’t want to go to the trouble of building a fire every time they need some heat.

Many regular campers swear by their camp stoves as an essential tool.

What Do You Need?

To make coffee on a camping stove, you’ll need some kind of kettle or other receptacle in which to boil your water.

Once the water is boiling, you add it to the grounds. You can use a French press to do this or try making cowboy coffee (described below).

You can also use a camping percolator, which is a specific tool for making coffee.

You could also use a percolator over an open flame, as long as it’s designed for it.

A bonus to using a percolator, you can still buy the classic blue with white speckles model that’s so iconic.

A coffee percolator that's blue with white speckles sitting on a portable camping stove.

There are many propane-powered camping stoves and cooking systems available. And some of them are quite lightweight.

Check out product reviews and talk to fellow camping enthusiasts to find the right one for you.

How To Make Coffee Without A Campfire

Any experienced camper will tell you that a campfire is no simple undertaking.

  1. It takes careful management.
  2. It’s one of the most important things you’ll do to be a good steward of the environment where you’re camping.
  3. It also takes time to build the kind of heat needed to boil water or cook food.

Taking all that into consideration, you mightn’t want to light a fire first thing when you wake up.

Especially if you don’t need it to cook and are planning to be away from your site for most of the morning.

One other simple method for how to make coffee when camping is to use a kettle on a camping stove. This was touched on above.

If you’re not planning on using the stove for anything but coffee, you can also get a propane-powered kettle.

These are smaller and more compact, making it much easier to bring to your campsite.

The Ghillie Camping Kettle

Another popular option is the Ghillie Camping Kettle. This is especially great if you don’t want to carry propane with you.

All you need to do is:

  1. add some water to the kettle,
  2. add some kindling to the base of the kettle,
  3. light a fire inside the kettle itself, and
  4. use anything you can find (leaves, twigs, paper, and other similar items) to fuel the flame.

Finally, if your car can go with you to your site, you can use your car’s power. Some kettles are designed to plug into your car’s outlet.

Some people might consider this cheating. But necessity is the mother of invention, after all.

If none of the options I’ve covered so far interest you, there’s always cowboy coffee.

What Is Cowboy Coffee?

Many aspects of the rugged cowboy have become the stuff of legend. This includes their morning drink of choice.

A cowboy holding a cup of coffee.

As all coffee is made by distilling coffee beans into a liquid, what makes cowboy coffee unique?

It boils down to the method of preparation.

Cowboy coffee is made over an open flame without:

  • fancy equipment,
  • electricity, or
  • a filter.

You can also add either salt or eggshells, but these ingredients aren’t necessary.

Eggshells In Coffee?

Hang on a sec… eggshells?! Yes, you read right. Eggshells!

A close-up of several cracked and empty eggshells.

I can hear you asking right now “What on earth would adding eggshells to coffee achieve”?

Well according to cowboys, it helps neutralize the acid in coffee. This improves the taste and helps get rid of the bitterness.

Them cowboys are pretty smart fellas!

How To Make Cowboy Coffee

To make it, boil your water over your campfire. Once boiled, pour it over your coffee grounds and add either a little bit of salt or crushed eggshells.

For the best extraction, the grounds should be coarse.

You can use whatever (reasonable) water-to-grounds ratio you want. Of course, this depends on the desired strength of your coffee.

Let it sit for a couple minutes, then give it a stir. Then, let it sit for a couple more.

If the grounds aren’t settling to the bottom, pour a little cold water over them.

Then pour out the liquid slowly to cut the amount of grounds in your cup. Enjoy!

Some Helpful Tools And Products For Camping Coffee

Okay, it’s time to admit that very few of us are actual cowboys.

And as rugged as cowboy coffee may make you feel, there are also easier ways to go about getting your brew in the wild.

I discussed a couple of options above. But let’s take a look next at some of the other products available for camping coffee.

The Aeropress:

Black and white image of person showing how to make coffee when cmaping with an AeroPress coffee maker.

The Aeropress coffee maker is a great option for how to make coffee when camping.

It’s very highly rated and recommended by experienced campers and camping organizations.

It’s easy to use at all steps of the process, from preparation to clean-up.

It’s even easy to discard the coffee grounds, which can be a process while camping.

The Aeropress is very lightweight, so it’s very convenient if you have to walk to your campsite.

It’s also durable, something that all campers have to keep in mind. It’s also very affordable.

Moka Pot:

A Bialetti moka pot sitting on a portable gas burner.

The Aeropress can make espresso-style coffee. But moka pots are designed for this purpose.

Moka pots are popular products in Europe, but have become more common in other parts of the world, too.

Their small, portable nature makes them great for camping.

Many well-known and well-trusted brands, such as Bialetti, make moka pots. The GSI is made for campers, as is EuroLux.

Hario V60:

Pouring hot water from a Hario Buono kettle into a Hario V60, sitting on a coffee mug. This is another way how to make coffee when camping.

The Hario V60 is the last model that I’ll talk about in this section.

The V60 is one of the least expensive options. But nonetheless users report that the coffee is high quality and tastes great.

It’s a coffee dripper. A filter is placed over a receptacle (often the cup itself) with grounds in it, and hot water is slowly poured over it.

As the water makes its way through the grounds, it’s flavored by the coffee bean grounds.

This results in a delicious cup of coffee. While delicious, the slow pour and setup need a bit more work than other options on this list.

Conclusion

In this post, I’ve covered various ways that show you how to make coffee when camping. I hope that you’ve learnt a thing or two.

Make sure you tell your friends about the eggshells.

If you have a different way you like to make coffee or something that I could improve with my suggested methods, let me know in the comments below.

Stay caffeinated!

AeroPress Vs Moka Pot – Which Is Best For You?

Disclosure: Some of these links are affiliate links, and at no additional cost, I earn a commission if you buy which helps to maintain this website.

Are you looking to make mind-blowing coffee from home? Have you found that your home coffee is mediocre at best?

Now imagine brewing the most delicious tasting coffee with all the delightful aromas. All from the comfort of your own home.

I assure you that it’s not only possible, it’s almost effortless.

On my coffee-making journey, I’ve been experimenting with different coffee brewing methods.

Recently, I’ve fallen in love with the AeroPress. But there may be a new contender for the best way to make coffee: the Moka Pot.

Keep reading to find which coffee maker will win in the battle of AeroPress Vs Moka Pot.

Text: AeroPress Vs Moka Pot. Image: A moka pot sitting on a kitchen gas stove with a jar of ground coffee behind it.

AeroPress

If you haven’t heard all the buzz surrounding the AeroPress, allow me to clue you in.

The AeroPress produces delicious coffee through the science of manual pressure. It’s pretty simple.

All you need to do is:

  1. place coffee grounds in the body of the press,
  2. fill it up with hot water to the desired level,
  3. put the plunger in, and
  4. apply pressure downward on the plunger.

The plunger forces the water to pass through the coffee grounds and into your desired cup. The result is a quick and delicious cup of coffee.

 

Now what about the Moka Pot?

Moka Pot

The Moka Pot is a tad more complicated than the AeroPress.

Instead of applying pressure by hand, the water boils upward through the grounds. This produces coffee that is similar in taste and color to espresso.

The pot has two chambers. One for the water and one for the brewed coffee. There’s also a filter that holds the ground coffee which sits inside the bottom water chamber.

Let me give you a quick rundown of how to use a Moka Pot:

  1. pour water into the bottom chamber,
  2. place the small filter with your ground coffee on top of it,
  3. screw the top chamber on,
  4. place the Moka Pot on the stove over medium heat.

As the water heats up and boils, it will propel the water upward through the coffee grounds. This water then bubbles up into the storage chamber.

 

This process takes a little less than 10 minutes. The result is a heavenly and flavorful coffee with a light layer of crema on top.

What Is Crema?

 

Close-up of a ceramic cup with coffee inside with crema on top.

Come on, you’re telling me you’ve never heard of crema? Crema is the aromatic froth that rests on the top of an espresso shot.

The reddish brown foam forms when water filters through fine ground coffee beans. Crema is seen as an indicator of quality espresso.

Can You Get Crema From A Moka Pot?

Yes, you can get crema from a Moka Pot. The Moka Pot produces crema every single time it brews.

The crema makes the coffee so smooth. It’s enough to get you addicted to the Moka Pot.

Can You Get Crema From An AeroPress?

Unfortunately, the AeroPress does not produce crema every time.

To make crema with the AeroPress, you have to follow a very specific technique. If you want to know how to make crema with an AeroPress, I’ll tell you how.

  1. First things first, you need the right coffee beans. Dark roasted beans are more capable of producing crema than light or blonde roasts. You could even select espresso beans if you’re trying to create that contemporary café vibe.
  2. Now that you’ve got your chosen beans, you need to grind them. To make crema, you want a fine grind. Fresh ground beans are the best contender for making crema. The super fine grind makes the water pass through the grounds slower. Coffee ground for drip brewers is often of a coarser grind. This is part of the reason why drip brewers can make you a whole pot of coffee in under 10 minutes.
  3. The correct water temperature is key for making crema as well. Water for your coffee should be around 200 degrees Fahrenheit (93 degrees Celsius). Water that is too cold will not produce crema. And water that is boiling or hotter will produce bitter, burnt coffee.
  4. Part of producing crema is the speed at which the coffee passes through the grounds. To slow down this process, use extra paper filters, an Aesir filter, or a fine metal filter. This will slow down the rate at which the water passes through the coffee.
  5. Finally, you have to apply a lot of force to the plunger. Get in there and apply that elbow grease if you want to produce some crema.

If you’re still struggling to get the results you’re after, don’t panic. You could try some different methods found here or watch this short video.

 

How Much Coffee Does Each Need?

AeroPress

aeropress sitting on top of cup

To make coffee in the AeroPress, you’re going to need about 17 grams of ground coffee.

That equals about 1½ tablespoons if you don’t use the scoop that comes with the AeroPress.

Moka Pot

When you’re using a Moka Pot, the amount of coffee you need depends on the size of your Moka Pot.

Each different sized model comes with a different sized filter. You’ll want to fill the filter to the top with coffee grounds.

While technically you could fill the filter with less grounds, it’s not recommended.

You should consider which size Moka Pot would best suit you and your needs before you buy.

How Much Coffee Do They Make?

Moka Pot

Moka Pots come in a variety of sizes. They can make one, three, four, six, nine or twelve cups of coffee.

That’s up to 22.7 ounces of freshly brewed, rich coffee. That’s definitely enough to caffeinate your guests when you’re hosting a get together.

Or you can spice up your life by drinking the whole pot’s worth yourself!

AeroPress

The AeroPress has a small brewing chamber, and it can produce up to eight ounces of coffee at a time.

When you’re looking to make a bulk serving of coffee, the AeroPress is not your friend.

Of course, the AeroPress produces coffee quickly, so you can make another cup in no time.

Playing host to guests is exhausting enough. I’m not sure you’d want to also hand press each person a cup of coffee.

Which One Is Better – Moka Pot Or AeroPress?

Like anything else in life, coffee is personal.

What you like, what you dislike, how much work you’re willing to put in for a cup of black gold varies from person to person.

But we’re talking about AeroPress Vs Moka Pot. There are a few qualities between the two that will help you decide which is best for you.

Effort

In the category of effort, AeroPress definitely wins. This is because it requires the least amount of effort and time.

But, the coffee brewer might not be able to effectively push down on the AeroPress. This could be because of missing limbs or arthritis, for example.

This wouldn’t make it a practical option.

Heat

Both methods of brewing coffee need hot water to produce the beverage.

Your kitchen space may be limited, or you mightn’t have a stove because you’re on the road.

AeroPress

The AeroPress can make your coffee without the use of a stove. But you would need to use an electric kettle or microwave (no! no! no!) to heat up your water.

Moka Pot

A side-view of a Moka Pot with a hand holding it up and some trees in the background.

The Moka Pot requires that you place the pot over a heat source to heat the water in the lower chamber.

The easiest way to do this would be to heat the pot on your stove or stove top cooker.

There’s also induction stove-top Moka Pots, which also come in a variety of sizes.

You can also heat up your Moka Pot over a campfire if you’re the outdoorsy type. Then you could create something close to Cowboy Coffee, which is actually pleasant to drink.

Both options are more portable than a plug-in coffee maker, so that’s a huge plus no matter which method you choose.

Time

I know I’ve already mentioned how the Moka Pot takes more time to brew coffee than an AeroPress. This is because it’s a critical factor.

Fast coffee is like fast food, it’s quick and convenient, but it doesn’t taste as good as the real thing.

If you have the time to spare, the Moka Pot can produce an exquisite and flavorful cup of coffee.

It will gently caress your taste buds as you sip it.

The Moka Pot may not be suitable for the hustle and bustle of your morning routine.

But imagine waking up late on a Sunday morning. All you want to do is unwind and savor the weekend.

I highly suggest you carve out the time to brew a cup worth savoring.

Cost

The most important factor for many consumers is the cost. How much does each cost? Will you save any money investing in this?

I can tell you that brewing your own coffee at home will save you money.

If you stop by your local coffee shop on your way to work every morning, you could be spending around $30 a week for coffee.

The average AeroPress and Moka Pot are only $30 each. So it’s a no-brainer!

Is Brewing Coffee At Home Cheaper?

You’ll save money brewing your own coffee at home. Guaranteed.

There are fancy versions of the Moka Pot that can run a little higher.

But the price difference is minimal when you realize that it’s around the cost of your coffee per week.

In one month, you’ll have saved $120 by not going to the coffee shop.

Twenty dollars of that can go toward one bag of premium ground coffee. Or you can buy some of the inexpensive stuff at around $5 a can.

The money you save brewing your own coffee will more than make up for the initial investment.

AeroPress Vs Moka Pot – The Verdict

As someone who has tried both methods of brewing coffee, the decision is yours.

There’s pros and cons to both brewing methods, but you’ll have to make the call now.

AeroPress

I can say that the AeroPress is best suited for people who look to coffee for the caffeine.

People with busy lives that don’t have the time or the patience to brew their coffee on the stove should go with the AeroPress.

It’s quick, affordable, and the upkeep is as simple as giving the press a quick wash after each use.

Moka Pot

The Moka Pot is the obvious choice for anyone who enjoys coffee for its flavor.

By a landslide, the Moka Pot produces a more flavorful cup of coffee. The science behind this brewing method makes it so.

The effort is definitely worth the reward for anyone who wants a smooth cup of coffee that is worthy of their favorite mug.

Have you tried the Moka Pot and the AeroPress? How did you find they compared? Which do you prefer? Let me know in the comments below!

Stay caffeinated!